A Small Beginning Can Lead to a Big Impact

goals oneword Jan 15, 2020

A small beginning can lead to a big impact!

God’s Word to Zerubbabel through Zechariah went like this, “Do not despise these small beginnings” (Zech. 4:10).

This message was delivered to discouraged leader and a demoralized people who were trying to get back on their feet after a difficult transition. In his doubt, Zerubbabel needed this message from the Lord…

Start small and see what a difference you can make when I’m in it with you!

Small beginnings in our lives can make a big difference

I’m approaching this new year with a focus on the small beginnings — the ones I believe God is in on.

What’s your temperature as you begin 2020? Optimistic? Excited? Overwhelmed? Doubtful? Cautious? Determined? Expectant? Curious?

I’m approaching this year from a posture of stillness.

Truth is, I’ve picked STILLNESS as my theme for 2020 — my one word. I’m very aware that I need to cultivate and practice stillness if...

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Six Habits that Spell Love L.I.S.T.E.N.

John Wayne once said, “You're short on ears and long on mouth.” I’m not sure who John was talking to but it could certainly have been me.

How about you? Do you ever find yourself short on ears and long on mouth?

Listening is one of the most loving things you and I can do at home, with our friends, and in the places where we lead and seek to make a kingdom difference. Paul Tillich agrees: “The first duty of love is to listen.”

Paul said, “Love cares more for others than for self…[love] doesn’t force itself on others, isn’t always me first…”

What gets in the way of effective listening

  1. We have our own interests (Phil. 2)
  2. It’s hard work
  3. We’re too busy to take the time required to really listen
  4. We have unresolved issues of our own lives that get in the way (ie. hurt, stress, insecurity, the need to be listened to)
  5. We feel like the person only wants to talk and isn’t open to my input
  6. We loose control of...
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Are You a Soldier or a Scout?

Are you more like a soldier or a scout?

A soldier’s job is to protect and defend a position. A scout’s job is to seek out and explore new possibilities. Two distinct approaches with very different outcomes.

In his book, The Book of Beautiful Questions, Warren Berger suggests that scout like behavior gives a leader a definite advantage.

During times of change and transition, this is especially true. We need flexibility and approach situations as scouts who are on the look out for new possibilities, new ideas, and new ways forward.

The Intellectual Humility of a Scout

“The mindset of a scout is rooted in curiosity. Scouts are more likely to say they feel pleasure when they learn new information or solve a puzzle. They’re more likely to feel intrigued when they encounter something that contradicts their expectations.”*

Leaders with scout-like behavior have what’s called intellectual humility.

Intellectual humility is “a state of openness...

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7 Insights to Help Shape Your Mindset

growth learning transition Jul 17, 2019

Working with churches in transition is challenging work and requires a certain type of leadership. The season of transition is messy and filled with a wide range of emotions and experiences.

After spending a few days training some transitional leaders and hearing stories from the front line, I made a few observations and gained some fresh insights I wanted to share with you hear. Feel free to add to this conversation.  

7 Insights to Help Shape Your Thinking and Practice

1. To learn new skills you have to get uncomfortable.

Pastors are often ill-equipped to be coach-like facilitative change management specialists. They must learn to use and strengthen new muscles. They must be aware of their learning gaps and be willing to go through the awkwardness of unlearning behaviors that get in the way of being an effective transitional pastor, leader, and coach.

It’s not easy or automatic to make the shift to a more coach-like approach to ministry. Pastors are trained to...

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Are You a Map Reader or a Navigator?

“Yesterday’s solutions and procedures may not provide an adequate or appropriate response to the present challenges. Hence, the biggest hurdles facing long-time leaders may not be in learning new insights and skills, but in unlearning what they consider to be tried and true and what thus provides them with a false sense of security.”
— Eddie Gibbs in Leadership Next

Your biggest challenge in working with a congregation in transition, may not be to simply find the right map to follow but in helping them unlearn what might be holding them captive to past solutions.

An analogy I've found helpful in thinking about the role of a traveling companion and coach to congregations in transition (of any kind) is to see our role not as map readers but as navigators. I give credit to Leonard Hjalmarson in his book, Broken Futures, for reminding me of this way of framing the work we do (a book I recommend you add to your reading list).

Eddie Gibbs says further,...

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